Gibraltar dating emails in ro

Rated 3.87/5 based on 836 customer reviews

Kemal Kilicdaroglu, head of the Cumhuriyet Halk Partisi (CHP) party, said 64 journalists have been imprisoned and “We are now facing a new period where the media is controlled by the government and the police and where most media bosses take orders from political authorities.” The government says most of the imprisoned journalists have been detained for serious crimes, like membership in an armed terrorist group, that are not related to journalism.

Bianet's periodical reports on freedom of the press in Turkey published in October 2015 recorded a strengthening of attacks on the opposition media during the AKP interim government in the third quarter of 2015.

Anyone not following the decisions of the commission were subject to imprisonment, between one and three years.

Freedom of speech was heavily restricted after the 1980 military coup headed by General Kenan Evren.

Following the Turkish War of Independence, the Sheikh Said rebellion was used as pretext for implementing martial law ("Takrir-i Sükun Yasası") on March 4, 1925; newspapers, including Tevhid-i Efkar, Sebül Reşat, Aydınlık, Resimli Ay, and Vatan, were closed and several journalists arrested and tried at the Independence Courts.

Meanwhile, the government continued to use the financial and other leverage it holds over media owners to influence coverage of politically sensitive issues.

Several dozen journalists, including prominent columnists, lost their jobs as a result of such pressure during the year, and those who remained had to operate in a climate of increasing self-censorship and media polarization.

Several journalists and editors are tried for being allegedly members of unlawful organisations, linked to either Kurds or the Gülen movement, others for alleged insults to religion and to the President.

In 2015 Cumhuriyet daily and Doğan Holding were investigated for "terror", "espionage" and "insult".

Leave a Reply